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Spinosaurus Ate Sharks! Yeah we said it. SCARY!!!

A group of paleontologists just reported that “unambiguous evidence” has been found suggesting that at least some species of Spinosaurus — a genus of theropod dinosaurs that lived in what is now North Africa during the Cretaceous period — were fond of swimming. And while that might not sound like a big deal, it’s obviously monumentally significant. One paleontologist behind the research detailing this latest evidence also believes this finding would revolutionize the understanding of dinosaur biology by scientists.

Reuters posted on the finding that was published recently in the journal of Nature. According to the article, the paleontologist and anatomist Nizar Ibrahim et al., author of the University of Detroit Mercy, evidence of a species of Spinosaurus, Spinosaurus aegyptiacus, having a tail in the shape of a “aquatic propulsive device” has been confirmed by new fossil findings. The new Spinosaurus fossil evidence has been discovered in south-eastern Morocco’s Sahara Desert, but it’s unclear when exactly the fossils were discovered.

In the video up top, Ibrahim describes the Spinosaur as “probably the most mysterious dinosaur out there.” This is partially because fossil data on the dinosaur species that lived around 95 million years ago has been so difficult to collect. While at one point apparently paleontologists had a Spinosaur skeleton which was lost during World War II.

Spinosaurus Ate Sharks Geek Impulse Science
© An illustration of Spinosaurus aegyptiacus’ skeletal system. nature video

Specifically, what Ibrahim et al. discovered is a collection of bones suggesting Spinosaurus aegyptiacus had a massive, fin-like tail that would have been ideal for propelling the 16,000-pound dinosaur through the water. And when Ibrahim sent the reconstructed form of the tail to Harvard researchers, they tested the efficacy of the hypothesized tail shape by examining a plastic version of it while submerged.

Spinosaurus Ate Sharks Geek Impulse Science
© An illustration of the fossil evidence found by Ibrahim et al. nature video

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